The 10 Best Things to Do in Central Macedonia, Greece

December 18, 2017 Jasper Kershner

Central Macedonia (Greek: Κεντρική Μακεδονία, Kentrikí Makedonía) is one of the thirteen administrative regions of Greece, consisting of the central part of the geographical and historical region of Macedonia. With a population of almost 1.9 million, it is the second most populous in Greece after Attica.

1. Museum of the Royal Tombs of Aigai (Vergina)

Imathia, Vergina 590 31, Greece +30 2331 092347
Excellent
87%
Good
8%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 842 reviews

Museum of the Royal Tombs of Aigai (Vergina)

Reviewed By cjcruzer2014 - Canada

Museum is very well laid out, with amazing displays. Contains contents from Phillip II's tomb (Alexander the Great's father) and another tomb called Royal Prince tomb. Not to be missed!

2. Cave of Alistrati

Alistrati 62045, Greece +30 2324 082045
Excellent
84%
Good
14%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
0%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 276 reviews

Cave of Alistrati

Alistrati cave is consider to be one of the most beautiful show caves in europe.

Reviewed By Amira M

Amazing tour of the most fantastic, unique and indescribable site. Our guide was extremely knowledgeable about the place and very informative. She was very happy to answer all our questions. I'd certainly recommend any visitor to Northern Greece to pay it a visit. Definitely a...MoreThank you for your review. We hope to see you again.

3. Museum of the Macedonian Struggle

23 Proxenou Koromila Labrou, Thessaloniki 546 22, Greece +30 231 022 9778
Excellent
81%
Good
15%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 189 reviews

Museum of the Macedonian Struggle

The Musesum of the Macedonian Struggle is a historical museum that presents the local history and cultural identity of Macedonia, keeping alive the memory of the struggles of Hellenism and highlighting the role of ordinary people who left indelible traces in a diverse cultural heritage. With the tours one discovers a lesser known but ideologically charged chapter of the Greek and Balkan history of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The Museum is open to the public Monday-Friday 9:00-14:00 and Saturday 10:00-14:00.

Reviewed By Paul H - Shrewsbury, United Kingdom

The museum building was once the Greek Consulate in macedonia and was built in 1894 and designed by Ernst Ziller.The museum is set over 3 floors. It is excellently illustrated with period photographs and well described in English.In display cases are uniforms, guns, swords,medals and more. In the basement there are several excellent dioramas which are very realistic. On the top floor is a reconstruction of the Consul General's office and more display cabinets. There are also several film displays with English voice overs. To obtain an understanding of Thessaloniki and the struggle to obtain independence it is essential to visit this museum. The staff are very helpful and friendly and speak excellent English. Excellent.

4. Church of Agios Nikolaos Orphanos

Irodotou and Apostolou Pavlou | Irodotou and Apostolou Pavlou, 54623, Thessaloniki 546 23, Greece
Excellent
81%
Good
16%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 137 reviews

Church of Agios Nikolaos Orphanos

Reviewed By Yiorgos B - Thessaloniki, Greece

The Church also served as the catholicon of a Byzantine monastery. It is built in the aisleless timber – roofed type with ambulatory, ending in the east with two chapels. Its exquisite mural decoration is one of most complete painting complexes preserved in Thessaloniki and is representative of Palaeologan art. Of the monastery complex, excluding the catholicon, only ruins of its entrance survive.

5. Church of Agios Dimitrios

Agiou Dimitriou 83, Thessaloniki 546 33, Greece +30 231 027 0008
Excellent
70%
Good
24%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 1 reviews

Church of Agios Dimitrios

Reviewed By Sasha L - Amsterdam, The Netherlands

A beautiful and atmospheric ancient Church in the middle of the city. Certainly worth a visit. It is a pity there are no leaflets in the Church explaining the history and guiding the visitor around. Also a more prominent donations box would be a great idea.

6. Roupel Bunker

Near Promahonas, Serres, Greece +30 2321 022274
Excellent
88%
Good
12%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 87 reviews

Roupel Bunker

Reviewed By Olga P - Mykonos, Greece

Such a beautiful experience.. the resident soldiers were all very polite and offered us a long tour of the site along with a very interesting historical narration. You start from the hillside peak overlooking the Greek-Bulgarian borders and Strymonas river, then you can take a close look to the various firearms and defending mechanisms used in the battles during WW2 and finally you visit the inside of the fort, the actual Catacombs and have the chance to know more about how the soldiers lived inside this massive construction that was approx 6.3km long. A useful tip: its a very nice gesture to bring something along for the soldiers, such as sweets etc.

7. Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki

Manoli Andronikou 6 | Manoli Andronikou 6, 54013, Thessaloniki 54013, Greece +30 231 331 0201
Excellent
70%
Good
24%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 1 reviews

Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki

Reviewed By Rebecca L

I really liked my visit! I am never sure if museums are worth it if they are not for free (for students), but I can recommend this one. I was happy that I decided to go.
The information was really interesting, I read almost everything.
If you are interested in the first settlement in Macedonia and the antiquity, you will have a good time!
I was probably not during a high time and so I felt like there were a lot of people guarding me and watching my steps, but I think if there would have been more people it would have been less uncomfortable :D
Oh! And the price is for everyone the same (they say, that was the reduced one an everyone will receive it). 4 Euros.

8. Trani Ammouda Beach

Ormos Panagias, Greece +30 2375 031809
Excellent
76%
Good
21%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 151 reviews

Trani Ammouda Beach

Reviewed By kiki116 - Athens, Greece

Wonderful big beach with perfect sand and nice surroundings. There are free places, that you can use your own beach equipment, but there is also a beach bar to drink or eat something. There is also a road with restaurants and cafes. I totally suggest a visit.

9. Sani Marina

Sani 63077, Greece +30 2374 099580
Excellent
76%
Good
18%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
2%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 160 reviews

Sani Marina

Reviewed By B1714D - Belgrade, Serbia

I wouldn't like to be misunderstood by this review of mine. The whole complex of Sani is spotless, clean and luxurious offering a demanding deep pocket tourist everything he'd expect. It's a pretty new resort opened few years ago with several high end hotels, plenty of nice restaurants, thick mattresses on sunbeds at the beach, golf courses, haute couture shops, luxurious villas, bungalows, pools...few of them private for villa users, manicured Gardens,...you name it. It's Kassandra's response to Sithonia's Porto Carras resort built two decades ago (to which I have same impressions).
But, what it lacks is soul. Greek soul. That's not why most people come to Greece. There's a theater like atmosphere. It's a kind of Disney resort you'd expect in Florida, not in Greece. You don't have to be a hotel guest to visit it, you can enter free and take photos of multi million yachts, have a triple priced drink or meal,...or just walk along the marina.

10. Zeitenlik WWI Cemetery

Lagada, Ampelokipoi 56727, Greece
Excellent
82%
Good
17%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 93 reviews

Zeitenlik WWI Cemetery

Reviewed By MikeWells90 - Brighton and Hove, United Kingdom

The Salonika campaign is a very much overlooked part
of World War 1 in Great Britain, where it is overshadowed
by the events on the Western Front, Gallipoli and Palestine.
However, for the people of Serbia the campaign is of great
significance. The cemetery contains the graves of Serbian,
French, Italian, Russian and British allies. There are also
graves of Bulgarian POWs.
The main section of the cemetary is devoted to the Serbian
graves and not surprisingly most of the visitors to the cemetery
are from Serbia.
The British section is at the far end of the cemetery. Like
Commonwealth War Graves Commission Cemeteries throughout
the world it is very attractively landscaped and well maintained.
The local staff are doing an excellent job. It is moving to walk
among the graves Reading the names, regiments and age of
the dead. It is notable that many of the ages are older than
might be expected. This is because a major cause of fatalities
was maleria, to which military support personnel were as much
at risk as front line troops.
If you are in Thessaloniki a visit is recommended.

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