What to do and see in South West England, England: The Best Lookouts

September 2, 2021 Nicolette Lion

Discover the best top things to do in South West England, United Kingdom including Cape Cornwall, Carnewas and Bedruthan Steps, Godrevy Point, Teignmouth Coastwatch, Anchor Head, Clevedon Pier and Heritage Centre, The Dodman, Orcombe Point, Sugar Lookout, Sand Point.

1. Cape Cornwall

Cape Cornwall Road, St Just England +44 1736 791543 http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/cape-cornwall
Excellent
80%
Good
18%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5.0 based on 591 reviews

Cape Cornwall

Reviewed By davidgD5846IV

I had never been to Cornwall before this trip. It was always too far, too much hassle, too much effort and you lose a large part of the day going backwards and forwards from London Sitting on the top of Cape Cornwall, I could have lost days without any effort and it would not have been any hassle. I spent a few days in St Just, and even after a hard days walking the coast path for 20 miles a time, it was completely effortless to walk down to the cape for the sunset. This place is beautiful, calm descends upon you like the night descends upon the day, and a gentle warm summer breeze blows away any tiredness. I was blessed enough to see the sun set on the horizon , gaze at Lands End, and watch a pod of dolphins swim from the south to north through the golden light of the sun upon the sea (sea ;) the photo. it doesn't do the scene justice!) Whatever weight of backpacks you carried on your shoulders all day, sit here, and watch the sun set , and the weight of the world will fall from you. To write more would be to waste your time. Just go and feel a place that can change how you feel

2. Carnewas and Bedruthan Steps

Bedruthan, St Eval PL27 7UW England +44 1637 860563 [email protected] http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/carnewas-and-bedruthan-steps
Excellent
82%
Good
15%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
0%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

5.0 based on 700 reviews

Carnewas and Bedruthan Steps

Reviewed By Pilgrimgreen - Harpenden, United Kingdom

Walked from Mawgan Porth to the NT cafe at Bedruthan Steps on a blowy December day (it takes around 45 mins, and is a lovely walk). The NT cafe (and little shop) are both great - warm welcome with some delicious options for a light lunch. Both are also very cosy on a chilly day. Highly recommended. Ps. It’s worth mentioning that the actual stairs down to the beach from here are closed Nov-Feb (I think). You can still enjoy views from the look out point at the top but you cannot descend during the winter months.

3. Godrevy Point

Gwithian England
Excellent
83%
Good
15%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5.0 based on 41 reviews

Godrevy Point

Reviewed By markgjames - Winsford, United Kingdom

This corner of St Ives bay is both very beautiful and very lively, the beach had great surf and the rock pools and coastal path were super to look around, we saw so many seals and pups too! National trust car park which for me made it free as being a member of the NT makes so much sense of you get out and about a fair bit - toilets were very busy and there were a couple of ice cream vans and cafes for snacks and drinks

4. Teignmouth Coastwatch

Teignmouth England http://www.teignmouth-nci.org.uk/
Excellent
78%
Good
22%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5.0 based on 9 reviews

Teignmouth Coastwatch

Reviewed By sandymL8269RF - Exeter, United Kingdom

I think coastwatch should get a lot more publicity. We have a small boat which we launch in Teignmouth and it is great to know that we will be logged and if we don’t come back someone will know. These good people are not paid they give their time willingly, to make the sea safer for those who use it.

5. Anchor Head

Madeira Cove Claremont Crescent, Weston super Mare England
Excellent
100%
Good
0%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5.0 based on 1 reviews

Anchor Head

6. Clevedon Pier and Heritage Centre

And HERITAGE Centre 4 The Beach, Clevedon BS21 7QU England +44 1275 878846 http://www.clevedonpier.com/index.htm
Excellent
55%
Good
32%
Satisfactory
9%
Poor
3%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 839 reviews

Clevedon Pier and Heritage Centre

Reviewed By KeithF718 - Weston super Mare, United Kingdom

We had been to Clevedon Pier about 5 years ago. Since then they have managed to get a lovely cafe/restaurant/toilets built into the beginning of the pier without spoiling the view of the pier.There is even a "port hole" window that looks under the pier. They also provide for wedding functions. It costs £3/£3.30 for entrance onto the pier and there is a small shop. When you climb the spiral staircase up to the 1st floor there is such a wealth of knowledge at your fingertips and in such a fun way that it transforms you into the history of the pier, the struggles and the joys, those early days of steamships and a timeline to pictorially show you what else was happening in the world at different times. The walk down the pier boards of this unique Grade 1 Listed pier has a pleasant calming atmosphere about it (on a calm day). The sun was shining, people were reading the name plaques all along the pier and the names on those plaques underfoot as well. As you near the end of the pier you are transformed into the 1800's and can imagine the hustle and bustle of passengers alighting from steamships to Wales and surrounding ports. Gentlemen wearing suits and ladies in their finery, some with maids in waiting. Back to today, workmen replacing the putty securing the ornate glass in the pagoda shelters to the sides, people sitting aloof on the cafe balcony taking coffee and ice cream. A couple studying the shape of the ship on the misty horizon trying to align it with the etchings of different types of ship on a sacque depicting about a dozen or so different vessels. An elderly mother and daughter relaxing on one of the bench seats leaning back and just breathing in the sea air and the peaceful quality of restful time. Quiet. Of course its not always this quiet but it was at this particular moment. Upstairs to the cafe we secured a corner table on the balcony overlooking the distant welsh shores lost in the mist of time. Unfortunately there were no fresh cakes or pastries, just pre-packed cakes, biscuits, chocolates and of course ice creams. The coffee was rich in flavour, the Bakewell tart melting as it touched the tongue. Time continued as we sat and relaxed in the warmth of the sun. A good sized cup of coffee, the large bakewell tart coming gnat £2.30 but worth it, the sweetness mixing with the taste of coffee. We descended the very strong iron staircase down to Pier level and took a leisurely stroll along the planks to the shop and exit.We spent 3 hours on the pier and heritage centre. All the staff were so nice and helpful. This is a heritage site that you just cannot rush. You must savour the richness and wealth of effort, blood sweat and tears that have gone into the restoration of this wonderful Pier. If you are in the area this is a wonderful place to visit. Over the past 10 years or so I have visited and photographed this amazing Pier.

7. The Dodman

Penare car park, Penare, Saint Austell, Gorran Haven PL26 6NY England http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/the-dodman
Excellent
75%
Good
21%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 28 reviews

The Dodman

Reviewed By lou181818 - Bath, United Kingdom

Spectacular coastal walk from Gorran Haven around the SW coastal path past Vaults beach to Dodman then on to the stunning Hemmick beach passing aqua coloured sea coves and Shetland ponies. We then went back along the lanes/across a couple of fields which was more direct and still had sea views. The path is unsuitable for buggies and those unsteady, some steep bits and could be slippy when wet.

8. Orcombe Point

Queens Drive, Exmouth EX8 2AY England
Excellent
71%
Good
21%
Satisfactory
8%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 48 reviews

Orcombe Point

Reviewed By MissRubyJewels

Highly recommended visiting Orcombe Point and the geoneedle for wonderful views over the bay and along as far as Dawlish Warren. Although there are far longer walks you can do we parked near by for free at Foxholes Hill and joined the costal path for about 10 minutes along to the needle and cliffs. Lots of interesting National Trust plinths on the way telling you about the local creatures and plants.

9. Sugar Lookout

above Marine Lake, Clevedon England http://www.clevedon-civic-society.org.uk/Lookout%20Project.html
Excellent
67%
Good
21%
Satisfactory
8%
Poor
4%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 24 reviews

Sugar Lookout

Reviewed By Ewyena - London, United Kingdom

The lookout is a viewpoint in Clevedon seaside, just in the very beginning of Poet's walk. If someone has a few step above the Marine lake, can find this small building with 3 opened window space to 3 different points of view. Very nice place to have a lookout before or after our path on Poet's walk. In clear weather we can see the land of Wales through the channel. The Sugar Lookout is a feature on Poets’ Walk. Originally was built by Ferdinand Beeston in early 1800' and have been used by a family of sugar importers to look out for ships sailing up the Bristol Channel, which were carrying sugar from the West Indies. It later fell into ruin but has recently been restored.

10. Sand Point

Beach Road, Kewstoke, Weston super Mare BS22 9UD England http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/brean-down/features/sand-point-and-middle-hope
Excellent
59%
Good
31%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
4%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 54 reviews

Sand Point

Reviewed By JuneBug1939 - Weston super Mare, United Kingdom

Middle Hope, leading onto Sand Point and Swallow Ridge, is a sequence of carboniferous limestone with unusual geological features including a Pleistocene-aged fossil cliff and has been designated as a SSSI. The underlying geology and soil types support scarce plants such as the smallflower buttercup, honeywort, Cheddar pink and Somerset hair grass. There is a stone Trig Point used by the archaeologists/scientists on Middle Hope just before you get to Swallow Ridge. Human use of the sites is shown by a bowl barrow and disc barrow from late Neolithic or Bronze Age and the site of a likely motte-and-bailey castle. Woodspring Priory, a former Augustinian priory which was founded in the early 13th century, sits just inland of the rocky promontory. The Priory and surrounding land is owned by the National Trust. We enjoyed our walk yesterday, up the steps from Sand Bay Carpark, up the craggy, muddy pathway onto Middle Hope, then along the coastline almost to Woodspring Priory and back. Such a wonderful day we had. Highly recommended!

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