What to do and see in Sanremo, Italy: The Best Places and Tips

October 2, 2017 Flossie Demartino

With a comfortable climate that varies little throughout the year, Sanremo has been a favored tourist destination since the mid-1700s, attracting visitors from all over Europe, including heavy contingents of Russian and British aristocracy. For many, the long stretch of beach is the main attraction, but don’t miss the impressive casino or the hillside medieval section of town called La Pigna. Every year since 1951, the city has hosted Italy’s popular Sanremo Music Festival.
Restaurants in Sanremo

1. Pista Ciclabile Area 24 - Sanremo

Sanremo, Italy +39 349 491 6209
Excellent
70%
Good
24%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 1 reviews

Pista Ciclabile Area 24 - Sanremo

Reviewed By kellyandlola

This is a well marked out, easy to follow, pretty much flat coastal path. We hired bikes from Ospedaletti and cycled the whole route, there a back with a few stops for lunch, refreshments and the beach. A great way to see this very beautiful part of the Ligurian coast line.

2. Santuario Madonna Della Costa

Mulattiera San Romolo 1, 18038, Sanremo, Italy +39 0184 503000
Excellent
55%
Good
38%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 111 reviews

Santuario Madonna Della Costa

Reviewed By Ken C - Derby, United Kingdom

Walk through the door and into the church and you will see a Wow factor that you usually experience in much larger Cathedrals etc!

3. Corso Matteotti

Corso Matteotti, Sanremo, Italy
Excellent
44%
Good
47%
Satisfactory
7%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 129 reviews

Corso Matteotti

Reviewed By ulysses4 - Westfield, Massachusetts

From very high end dress and jewelry shops, to discount clothing, this pedestrianized shopping street provides a pleasant stroll through the heart of Sanremo. It is the very old pharmacies, pastry shops, cafes and mom and pop haberdashers that give it a bit of uniqueness. The town has faded; come back a bit and continues to have a distinct flavor.

4. Old Bussana (Bussana Vecchia)

Miles NE Of 5, Sanremo, Italy +39 335 841 7839
Excellent
54%
Good
31%
Satisfactory
9%
Poor
4%
Terrible
2%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 993 reviews

Old Bussana (Bussana Vecchia)

Devastated by an earthquake and abandoned, this unique medieval village has been reborn and is now inhabited by an international artists community.

Reviewed By beanie999 - England

Set off from Sanremo following a route suggested by Google Maps. Quite easy to follow. Wouldn't recommend unless you were in good shape as very steep in places and a fair bit of ascent. Take water, a towel and a spare top if doing this in summer. About an hour's walk to Bussana Vecchia. With the walk back to Bussana and then along a the coast to Sanremo was a total of ~14km with ~500m ascent. Great views along the way. Total including visit was ~3hrs; perfect morning exercise for a lunch in Sanremo.
Bussana Vecchia itself was worth the trip. Abandoned over 100yrs ago, it is now home to a large number of independent artists. The mix is strange, but creates a great atmosphere. Jazz music and piano drifting through the air as you walk between old Italian village ruins. Difficult not to think of the people that once lived here, and had to leave.
Not sure all artists welcomed the intrusion of smartphone welding tourists. There was some very good art on display - other more passable. Overall a wonderful peaceful feel to the place.

5. La Pigna

Sanremo, Italy
Excellent
36%
Good
44%
Satisfactory
11%
Poor
3%
Terrible
6%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 579 reviews

La Pigna

Reviewed By Kadriye u

It's like a big surprise to see this much characteristic medieval city right inside a modern city center. It's like two difrent nested cities, one hiding inside an other. Impressing experience to strolling down tiny amazing medieval streets of la pigna and many chance to take good photos there.

6. Corso dell'Imperatrice

Sanremo, Italy
Excellent
39%
Good
42%
Satisfactory
13%
Poor
4%
Terrible
2%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 200 reviews

Corso dell'Imperatrice

Reviewed By Travellingisagift - Oslo, Norway

From the villa of Alfred Nobel, we walked down towards the beach and started walking on this beautiful Promenade. There were no vendors at the time we were there. Very peaceful and the sun was shining. Super relaxing. There are benches to sit facing the sea. Pure relaxation. The palm trees make it even more majestic. There was a park nearby in fact close to Alfred Nobel's villa before you reach this Promenade. We were attracted by the greenery and it looks so relaxing.

7. Piazza Bresca

Sanremo, Italy
Excellent
37%
Good
46%
Satisfactory
12%
Poor
4%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 161 reviews

Piazza Bresca

Reviewed By stefano g - Sanremo, Italy

A really nice spot in the centre of Sanremo where you can find a wide range of locals for eating and drink.. it's less than 50 metres from the sea and it is surrounded by characteristic Italian houses. Beautiful !

8. Russian Orthodox Church (San Basilio)

Via Luigi Nuvoloni 2, 18038, Sanremo, Italy +39 0184 531807
Excellent
42%
Good
40%
Satisfactory
15%
Poor
2%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 512 reviews

Russian Orthodox Church (San Basilio)

Reviewed By Пётр Е

As you can see from the pic the church is in renovation and we couldnt see inside. And because of that it was closed. Anyway in the inside nothing unusual, I'm 100% positive.

9. Tre Ponti

Strada Tre Ponti, 18038, Sanremo, Italy +39 0184 579771
Excellent
42%
Good
40%
Satisfactory
14%
Poor
3%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 178 reviews

Tre Ponti

Reviewed By Carlo M - Milan, Italy

A nice surprise in east Sanremo nwar cycle path. A crescent of soft sand with good waves and wind clear water. Sun shades and spectacular view. Nice and pleasant restaurant. Best beach in the area foe everyone.

10. Villa Nobel

Corso Felice Cavallotti 116, 18038, Sanremo, Italy +39 0184 507380
Excellent
41%
Good
38%
Satisfactory
16%
Poor
3%
Terrible
2%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 224 reviews

Villa Nobel

Reviewed By Vierdank - Stockholm, Sweden

Alfred Nobel moved for health reasons from Paris to Sanremo in 1890. He had found a suitable villa, where he also moved his laboratory (reconstructed with help from the Swedish Nobel foundation). Today little of his belongings inside the house remains. His bedroom, where he died 1896 on the 10th of december (which became the date for the Nobel price festivities) is furnished with a bed - could be the very bed...
But the house itself - and its garden - is beautiful and well worth seeing.
Most annoying are the sparse opening times; in Italian manner arranged in a complicated and unlogical manner. What's worse is that information on the web site not necessarily corresponds with the actual opening times. So double check the opening hours on the web with a phone call to the museum.
Please also note that most text written in the exhibition is in Italian only...

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