Top 10 Things to do in Tripoli, Lebanon

March 8, 2018 Natalie Tallman

Discover the best top things to do in Tripoli, Lebanon including Citadel Saint Gilles (Qal'at Sinjil), Khan Al-Khayyatin, Al-Mina Port, Taynal Mosque, The Great Mosque, The Clock Tower, Souk Al-Harajb, Ezzeddine Hammam, Al-Shoker Mosque, Al Burtasiyat Madrassa-Mosque.
Restaurants in Tripoli

1. Citadel Saint Gilles (Qal'at Sinjil)

El Amir Fakhreddine, Tripoli, Lebanon
Excellent
52%
Good
30%
Satisfactory
16%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 65 reviews

Citadel Saint Gilles (Qal'at Sinjil)

Reviewed By UNNIMAYA - Abu Dhabi UAE

Built at a vantage point offering a birds eye view of Tripoli, this crusader castle dating back to 1103 has currently a heavy military presence currently- however this should not bother you since they keep to themselves.
There are permanent exhibits in the castle which are worth visiting to understand the history associated with this monument. And of course there are plenty of photo opportunities.
You can spend about an hour of two visiting the castle and the nearby souk after parking your car in one of the paid manned private parking lots.

2. Khan Al-Khayyatin

Tripoli, Lebanon
Excellent
58%
Good
30%
Satisfactory
12%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 33 reviews

Khan Al-Khayyatin

Reviewed By Waleed E

Khan AlKhayatin was rennovated in 2007 with the help of Spain. Khan al-Khayateen is part of the Old Souks of Tripoli. It is mostly showcases of oriental, and traditional Lebanese clothing.

3. Al-Mina Port

Tripoli, Lebanon
Excellent
52%
Good
36%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
7%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 38 reviews

Al-Mina Port

Reviewed By Tony W - Sydney

This is an interesting and historical area to visit when in Tripoli. It is however like the rest of the city very messy and dirty.

4. Taynal Mosque

Tripoli, Lebanon
Excellent
73%
Good
23%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 21 reviews

Taynal Mosque

Reviewed By Abdul Hamid M - Lebanon

I just love this historical mosque. It keeps glowing, it seems due to continuous maintenance. It's so beautiful, specially the interior, it's amazing and warm and gives high spiritual feeling. It's a must visit..

5. The Great Mosque

Tripoli, Lebanon
Excellent
52%
Good
36%
Satisfactory
12%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 25 reviews

The Great Mosque

Reviewed By Sade2 - Muscat, Oman

The place is amazing in winter, entrance is allowed for non Muslims men, but for women they need to wear a scarf.

6. The Clock Tower

Tripoli, Lebanon
Excellent
46%
Good
36%
Satisfactory
18%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 22 reviews

The Clock Tower

Reviewed By Tony W - Sydney

The clock tower in Tripoli is A reminder of this city's history. Built during the reign of the Ottoman Empire it is an interesting artefact and well worth a photograph or two.

7. Souk Al-Harajb

Tripoli, Lebanon
Excellent
18%
Good
58%
Satisfactory
18%
Poor
6%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 16 reviews

Souk Al-Harajb

Reviewed By Sheri L - Carcassonne Center, France

Tripoli is a city that needs to grow on you as you explore deeper, further, wider, to come to terms with its character.
The new city has developed at a distance from the original heart of Tripoli - or perhaps, as it was explained to me by a student from the city, it is in fact three cities in one and its Greek name is therefore enduringly true today: tri (three) 'polis' (cities). Tarabulus, its name in Arabic. The Phoenicians knew it as Athar before that. Settlement dates back to 1400 BC.
Tripoli is considered to date to the 14th century BC. It boasts the largest Crusader fortress in Lebanon, the Citadel of Raymond de Saint-Gilles. Its Mamluk architecture is second only to Cairo.
There are few foreign visitors at present owing to regional security issues but it is worth travelling there at such a time. The locals helped me with directions, took me to the souk, to the coach terminal etc. as I was there during the municipal elections and there were few taxis.

8. Ezzeddine Hammam

Amir Fakhreddine Street | Near Souk el-Nahhassin, Tripoli, Lebanon
Excellent
55%
Good
36%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
9%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 11 reviews

Ezzeddine Hammam

Reviewed By MarwaAD - Beirut

Tripoli's First Mamluke Hammam
A Hammam or bathhouse played a prominent role in the lives of people in the Muslim world for centuries. One could compare them to saunas in Hungary today, the public and private hammams of Istanbul, Aleppo, or Tunis used to fulfill an important role, which was reflected by the number of bathhouses in Oriental cities. Hammams were traditionally located near mosques for prayers to clean themselves and relax; they also played an important role as places for meeting others and developing social relations.
Hammam Ezzedine was the first hammam built in Mamluke Tripoli and remained the largest and most important one in the city. According to an article featured on Archnet.org, Ezzedine's bath follows very closely the pattern and arrangement of Syrian baths. For the practical purpose of saving and keeping heat, this bathhouse, like most hammams, is surrounded by buildings and is hardly visible from the outside; as was also then customary, the facade was kept plain.
Though no longer operational, Hammam Ezzedine in the Hadid district, near the Souk el-Nahhassin and the Khan al-Khayyatin is an impressive historical site that occupies a 745 square metre area and that has undergone extensive restoration.
You can visit this site where there is no entrance fee and there are numerous roll-up banners inside that would guide you regarding its history, architecture, and much more!

9. Al-Shoker Mosque

Al Mina, Seaside road, Tripoli, Lebanon
Excellent
67%
Good
33%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 3 reviews

Al-Shoker Mosque

Reviewed By Kozmopolitan - Lebanon

This the most beautiful mosque in Tripoli in my opinion, it has been made of expensive materials, looks like Turkish style, similar to Al Amin mosque in Beirut but Al-Shoker is smaller, it is very clean and quiet worship place.

10. Al Burtasiyat Madrassa-Mosque

Tripoli, Lebanon
Excellent
50%
Good
50%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 2 reviews

Al Burtasiyat Madrassa-Mosque

Reviewed By Sheri L - Carcassonne Center, France

I chanced upon this small and beautiful mosque-madrassa set in a garden on the west bank of the neglected Abou Au river just outside the Souk al Haraj and below the Citadel of Raymond de Saint Gilles.
Old men sat around the upper gate entrance and scowled at a Western woman seeking entry to the garden but I managed a couple of photographs and left the garden, crossing the river and looking back onto the little site. A very beautiful Mamluk entrance is well preserved.
According to sources: "Designed by an Andalusian architect, Prince Issa Bin Omar Al Bertasi Al Kerdi had the mosque and school constructed in the early 14th century. "
The garden is a tranquil haven and the river still flows below its wall even though the locals pile their trash on its banks.

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