The 10 Best Things to do Good for Big Groups in Province of Huesca, Aragon

June 21, 2021 Velvet Mowry

Huesca (Aragonese: Uesca, Catalan: Osca), officially Huesca/Uesca, is a province of northeastern Spain, in northern Aragon. The capital is Huesca.
Restaurants in Province of Huesca

1. Parque Nacional Ordesa Y Monte Perdido

22376 Torla Spain +34 974 24 33 61 https://www.ordesa.net/
Excellent
88%
Good
11%
Satisfactory
1%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5.0 based on 1,736 reviews

Parque Nacional Ordesa Y Monte Perdido

Reviewed By sofiiapaniv

We took bus from Torla to the park. They go every 20-30 min and cost around 4 Euro. Once you reach the park, you can have hot drink and a snack in the only restaurant. It was quite cool in the morning (in the beginning of Sept, 8 am, 13 degrees), but by the end of the trip it became hot under the sun. We climbed up to the main viewpoint (Mirador de Calcilarruego - the view was amazing), then went along the canyon to the waterfall (Cola de Caballo), after that went through the valley back to the bus. The waterfall and river were quite dry but still beautiful. Whole trip took us 9 hrs. The easier option (and the only option if it is raining) is to avoid climbing and just walk through the valley to waterfall and back.

2. Valle de Pineta

22350 Bielsa Spain
Excellent
82%
Good
16%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5.0 based on 386 reviews

Valle de Pineta

Reviewed By grantb227 - Singapore, Singapore

The Valle Pineta offers stunning scenery with jagged mountains on three sides. Great for hiking and for accessing the Monte Perdido and Oropesa national park. In winter it also offers cross country skiing. Easy access into France and the skiing there.

3. Canon de Anisclo

Hu-631, 22375 Escalona Spain http://www.ordesa.net/rutas/anisclo
Excellent
82%
Good
15%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
0%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

5.0 based on 290 reviews

Canon de Anisclo

Reviewed By HagChi - Munich, Germany

We came to Nerin to see and hike this canyon after one week hiking in and around the Ordesa near Torla. This Canyon has quite different charateristics than the Faja trails in Ordesa. It is like a slot canyon cut through by a river. We started from the second parking after having entered the canyon from the side of Nerin. The hike is slightly less strenuous than in Ordesa, has shade most of the time (quite sunny and hot in July) and yet beautiful. We hiked until La Ripareta where we took a rest and soaked our feet in the chilling river. Then we continued until Pasarela Los Estrechos where there is another waterfall, a bridge and rocks to sit on. This second part was slightly more difficult than the first part, yet manageable if one is normally fit. It is not a circular treck. We decided to back track after rest point at Pasarela Los Estrechos. This canyon is less known and less touristic. However, we rate the hike higher than those in the Ordesa. The logistic of this canyon is also less convenient. If you enter from the side of Nerin by car, you have to park your car in the first parking and walk down the road for minimum 30 minutes to hike into the canyon at the second parking. The second parking can only be reached by car from the side of Vio. This main part of the canyon can be driven though but in one direction, from south to north. We found this arrangement very inconvenient. The way how it is "designed" confirms that it is not catered for mass tourism, unlike in the Ordesa. However, it is free of charge :-))

4. Benasque Cerler Anciles

Benasque Spain
Excellent
80%
Good
20%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5.0 based on 46 reviews

Benasque Cerler Anciles

5. Valle de Bujaruelo

22376 Torla Spain
Excellent
85%
Good
13%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5.0 based on 80 reviews

Valle de Bujaruelo

Reviewed By pthomas156 - Newport, United States

So, little did we know when booking in Torla the weekend of May 1, that's a long holiday weekend in Spain. Torla and the popular Ordesa National Park were swarming with visitors. Normally, during off-season, you can just drive into the park and leave your car. In high season, you have to take a bus from the visitors center and its gigantic parking lot. Of course, May 1 was considered high-season from Friday to Monday! We went to the visitors center and the line for the bus at 11 am was at least a block long. So at our hotel, they suggested visiting the Valle e Bujaruelo across from the national park. This turned out to be a great idea. Tho it didn't seem that way at first. The only road we could see (it's right across from the national park entrance) was really narrow and bumpy -- so much so we weren't sure if it really was a road we were supposed to be using. Then another car came past us from the opposite way, and they looked like tourists, so we figured, OK. Both cars could barely fit on the road. We kept going. The mountain scenery was gorgeous, if right on top of us. The electric lines for the area seem to pass through here, so we again began to wonder if the road was just for workers. But then we came to a bridge with a beautiful view, and we took out our picnic food and ate. A few more cars passed us coming down the mountain valley, so we decided to proceed. Spring flowers everywhere. More bumps. A sign for a Refugio. Hmmmm. So we kept going until we indeed did end up at the Refugio and a pretty big car park and a lot of people going on walks, picnicking around the river, playing with their kids, and having coffee outside on the cafe terrace. Whaddyaknow? A lot of walks leave from here; we tried to take the short "ornithological" one which is just up one side of the river and back down, but it was actually too muddy to get too far because we didn't have hiking boots. Anyway, there was an old Roman bridge that was amazingly picturesque in the midst of this wide open valley. We didn't have to wait in line for anything, and we loved it.

6. Cathedral of Jaca

Plaza San Pedro 1, 22700, Jaca Spain +34 974 36 21 85 http://www.diocesisdejaca.org
Excellent
48%
Good
39%
Satisfactory
12%
Poor
0%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 720 reviews

Cathedral of Jaca

The Cathedral of St Peter the Apostle is a Roman Catholic church located in Jaca, in Aragon, Spain. It is the seat of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Jaca. It is the first Romanesque cathedral built in Aragon (1070s - early 12th century)and one of the oldest in the Iberian peninsula. Its current appearance is the result of later additions and modifications introduced especially in the early modern period (from the late XVth to late XVIIIth century). Don´t hesitate to visit us!

Reviewed By SallyKatharine

The cathedral of St Peter in Java was ordered by Ramiro I, first king of Aragón, and built by Sancho Ramirez, the second. The original building dates from the eleventh century, and there are elements of other eras, from Romanesque to Gothic to Plateresque to Baroque. There are many curious features, including the silver coffers under the altar containing the bones of ancient saints, the statue of the "holy trinity" a copy of Michaelangelo's Moses, the ceiling of the apse, painted by Miguel de Bayeu. I'm very fond of the wrought iron railings around the two side chapels which are a thousand years old and come from little churches. The side door of the cathedral is decorated with Romanesque capitals (the originals in the museum) the most famous of which is David and the musicians. I could go on, but the thing to do is visit, see it for yourself!

7. Huesca Cathedral

Plaza Catedral 4, 22002 Huesca Spain +34 974 22 06 76 [email protected] http://www.diocesisdehuesca.org/directorio/catedral/historia.htm
Excellent
44%
Good
42%
Satisfactory
12%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 407 reviews

Huesca Cathedral

Reviewed By 15ashleighp

We’ve visited many cathedrals and religious buildings across Spain. I didn’t really have any expectation of this small cathedral. However it’s absolutely beautiful. Some of the most intricate details I’ve seen in a while. Go up the bell tower if you dare. 180 steps up and down through a very narrow staircase. You’re met with the most stunning views. We happened to be next to the bells as the clock struck 12. I’ve never heard (or felt) anything like it. Definitely worth a visit if you’re in Huesca. €4.50 entry, which is totally worth every penny.

8. Estacion Internacional de Canfranc

Avenida de Fernando el Catolico 2, 22880 Canfranc Spain +34 974 37 31 41 [email protected] http://www.canfranc.es/turismo_canfranc_pirineos.php?idRec=5
Excellent
54%
Good
32%
Satisfactory
8%
Poor
4%
Terrible
2%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 876 reviews

Estacion Internacional de Canfranc

Reviewed By SallyKatharine

Canfranc was a smallish village near the Aragonese border in the central Pyrenees. Towards the end of the 19th century it was decided that a railway line should be built across the mountain pass, the last stage being an eight-kilometre tunnel opening out into the steep, narrow valley of Arañones. On the 18th July 1928, King Alfonso XIII inaugurated the massive station building, designed to impress travellers with its grandeur and modernity. The railway line in France was closed when a bridge fell down in 1970, but in Spain trains have continued to run, slowly and not very frequently, but they run. The station, on the other hand, was allowed to go to rack and ruin until recently, when the Aragonese government bought it. A fair amount of work has been done and more will be needed, but what we saw was truly impressive. A guide took us in and explained the history of the building and the adventures of the railway in both Civil and World War. Depth interesting and worthwhile.

9. Vinas del Vero

Calle de Naval km. 3,7, 22300, Barbastro Spain +34 974 30 22 16 [email protected] http://www.vinasdelvero.es
Excellent
67%
Good
26%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 164 reviews

Vinas del Vero

Viñas del Vero se establece en Somontano a finales de 1986 con la adquisición de 550 hectáreas de terreno en Barbastro y otras poblaciones cercanas. En 1987 comienzan a replantarse los terrenos con viñedos de las variedades tradicionales de la región (Tempranillo, Moristel, Garnacha y Macabeo), junto a otros de distintas procedencias (Chardonnay, Gewürztraminer, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot y Pinot Noir). Los primeros vinos de la bodega aparecen en el mercado en 1990 y son elaborados en una bodega experimental de Salas Bajas. En 1987, la empresa había adquirido la finca “San Marcos” para la construcción de la nueva bodega, que se inauguraría en julio de 1993. En ella, se desarrolla todo el proceso de elaboración de los Viñas del Vero, desde la selección de la vendimia hasta la crianza y el embotellado. En 2019, Viñas del Vero fue la primera bodega de Aragón que recibió el certificado “Wineries for Climate Protection” por su compromiso con la sostenibilidad y el medioambiente.

10. Museo Diocesano de Jaca - Arte Romanico

Plaza Catedral S/N, 22700, Jaca Spain +34 974 36 21 85 [email protected] http://www.diocesisdejaca.org
Excellent
72%
Good
24%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 284 reviews

Museo Diocesano de Jaca - Arte Romanico

"One of the most beautiful collections of romanesque wall paintings in the world" -Le Monde-

Reviewed By AlbertSalichs - Manresa, Spain

Museo Diocesano de Jaca is the art museum located inside the Jaca Cathedral, in the center of this town, located in Aragon Pyrenees, in the North of Spain. I went to visit the museum in the middle of August, but I did not have so many time and I had to visit it fastly, so I returned in the middle of September, because the Romanesque pictures are great! Really so interesting! In fact, in the first part of the museum, you will see all original Romanesque paintings from some churches in the surroundings of Jaca, which were ripped off the original wall in the middle of 20th Century. Nowadays it is not correct, but then it was the only possibility to save and keep these pictures. For me, a top in Jaca!

ThingsTodoPost © 2018 All rights reserved.