10 Things to Do in San Jacinto That You Shouldn't Miss

January 12, 2018 Etsuko Causey

San Jacinto is a city in Riverside County, California. It was named after Saint Hyacinth and is located at the north end of the San Jacinto Valley, with Hemet to its south and Beaumont, California, to its north. The mountains associated with the valley are the San Jacinto Mountains. The population was 44,199 at the 2010 census. The city was founded in 1870 and incorporated on April 20, 1888, making it one of the oldest cities in Riverside County.
Restaurants in San Jacinto

1. The Country Club at Soboba Springs

1020 Soboba Rd, San Jacinto, CA 92583-2924 +1 951-654-4300
Excellent
40%
Good
30%
Satisfactory
13%
Poor
4%
Terrible
13%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 23 reviews

The Country Club at Soboba Springs

Nestled in the foothills of the San Jacinto mountain range, the Country Club at Soboba Springs is a hidden gem surrounded by spectacular panoramic view and features waterfalls, streams and glimpses of indigenous wildlife. Our 32,000 sq ft Clubhouse with its Tuscan inspired architecture and knotty pine interior create a cozy ambiance. With a full service restaurant, special event spaces and a Par 72 - 7,165 yard PGA Championship golf course make the Country Club at Soboba Springs the perfect venue for a multitude of events including Weddings, Quinceanaras, Reunions, Retreats, Holiday parties, Birthdays, Golf Tournaments and much much more.

Reviewed By JLTP - Dix Hiils, NY

This is a very scenic, somewhat difficult course. Condition was good as was the pace of play. Our issue was the lack of cart service (because it was Wednesday, we were told) combined with the snack bar being closed at 1:45 (apparently, because the staffer was on a break). What snack bar closes in the middle of lunch hour? We were told we could get food upstairs at the full service restaurant, but we were at the turn and didn't want to wait the stated 20+ minutes for food and lose our place on the course. I appreciate the restaurant food is freshly prepared, but management has dropped the ball on this issue for the many golfers seeking a quick bite/refreshment during their round.

2. Western Science Center

2345 Searl Pkwy, Hemet, CA 92543-9706 +1 951-791-0033
Excellent
52%
Good
33%
Satisfactory
13%
Poor
2%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 75 reviews

Western Science Center

Western Science Center is home to a fascinating array of Native American artifacts and Ice Age fossils that were unearthed at Diamond Valley Lake. You'll be moved by "Max", the largest mastodon found in the Western United States, as well as "Xena", a Columbian mammoth. Let your imagination run wild as you walk on tempered glass which houses "Little Stevie", a large mastodon installed beneath the museum floor to re-create the actual dig site.

Reviewed By BRENT C - OMAHA

The Western Science Center (WSC), formerly the Western Center for Archaeology & Paleontology, is a museum located near Diamond Valley Lake in Hemet, California. The WSC is home to a large collection of Native American artifacts and Ice Age fossils that were unearthed at Diamond Valley Lake, including "Max", the largest mastodon found in the western United States, and "Xena", a Columbian mammoth.
Opened in 2006, the museum has been designed to provide world-class facilities for the research, curation, and presentation of the nearly one million specimens discovered during the development of Diamond Valley Lake in Hemet.
The museum features a 156 feet long exterior walkway that holds a life-on-Earth time line. The welcome lobby features 24 feet high walls with re-created paleontological strata and reproduction fossils projecting from the walls.
The tour of the permanent gallery begins with interactive exhibits on the natural history of Domenigoni and Diamond Valleys, continuing through displays on European and Native American culture and history from the area. Among the artifacts on display are pieces donated by the Domenigoni family, the original settlers of the valley, and the Soboba band of Luiseño Indians that inhabited the area before them.
Visitors can view two movies on the construction of Diamond Valley Lake, and the fauna of the Pleistocene in the Diamond and Domenigoni Valleys, shown in a 270 degree immersive theater that shakes with the movies. From there, visitors proceed to the paleontology gallery, replete with fossils recovered and studied by scientists from the San Bernardino County Museum. The highlights of this gallery are the skeletons of "Max", the largest mastodon ever discovered in the western United States, and "Xena", a Columbian mammoth. Also featured in the gallery is "Li'l Stevie", one of the most complete mastodons known from the western United States, who is displayed unreconstructed and still partially buried as found when it was first uncovered. The gallery also features the skeletons of a Harlan's ground sloth, and interactive displays on the disciplines of archaeology and paleontology. Visitors can also visit temporary traveling exhibits in the 3,000 square feet temporary exhibit area.
The museum also features a full-scale simulated archaeology and paleontology dig site, which opened for its first student excavations in the spring of 2009. It is currently being used by WSC staff, in association with local K-12 schools and colleges, to teach proper excavation methodology to students. It is also open for museum visitors to view an active dig site in process.


10 am – 5 pm Tuesday through Sunday
(Last ticket sold at 4:30 p.m., Museum Closes at 5:00 p.m.)
2017 Admission
Adults (13 and over) $8.00
Seniors (62+) $6.50
Youth (5 to 12) $6.00
Students (13-22 with current I.D.) $6.50
Youth 4 and under FREE
Active Military (with current I.D.)* FREE
$2.00 (free to members) Audio Tour
*Individual only, offer does not include dependents

3. Desert Hills Premium Outlets

48400 Seminole Dr, Cabazon, CA 92230-2125 +1 951-849-6641
Desert Hills Premium Outlets

Reviewed By SymnCwl - Memphis

One of the largest outdoor outlet malls in the country (180 stores). Many, many brand name outlet stores spread out over four lots. Get a map and plan your trip. Two food courts. Very busy. That said, unless you are shopping for something specific or want to get your steps in, it's pretty typical.

4. Mount San Jacinto State Park and Wilderness

25905 Highway 243, Idyllwild, CA +1 909-659-2607
Excellent
79%
Good
21%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 167 reviews

Mount San Jacinto State Park and Wilderness

This 13,000-acre park offers over 50 miles of trails in the mountains soaring above the Sonora desert.

Reviewed By MandC0218 - Riverside, California

Hiked to Suicide Rock which was was such a great hiking experience working our way up to the summit with it's breathtaking and amazing views . Fresh air, the sounds of nature and these views made this one of our best hikes. There are many trails within Mount San Jacinto Park and each trail and the different seasons offer a unique experience. Highly recommended.

5. Mt San Jacinto State Park - Stone Creek Campground

Idyllwild-Pine Cove, San Jacinto, CA 92549 +1 951-659-2607
Excellent
80%
Good
20%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 5 reviews

Mt San Jacinto State Park - Stone Creek Campground

Reviewed By Shilpa C - San Diego, California

I found the campsites here to be bigger than usual. All sites have a bench and a fire pit. Some sites also have electricity. Restrooms are pretty neat (no water/light). Clear skies = lot of visible stars. Very pleasant night temperatures in June. Highly Recommend this campsite if you are in this area.

6. Ramona Bowl Amphitheatre

27400 Ramona Bowl Rd, Hemet, CA 92544-8108 +1 800-645-4465
Excellent
57%
Good
32%
Satisfactory
8%
Poor
3%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 58 reviews

Ramona Bowl Amphitheatre

Reviewed By TooMuch2Do - Laguna Niguel, California

I've been wanting to come to the performance of Ramona for 25 years and finally got there. It is an iconic, historic performance of an important period in California history, well told, and everyone should see it at least once.

Unless you are local, it's a couple hours drive from LA, San Diego, or Orange County. Make sure to allow enough time for traffic; the last couple of miles are side streets.

Parking is $5. The road winds around past the performers' lot where you pay. Then you circle the entire parking lot, past the drop-off point at the entrance, and past the extensive, close-in handicapped parking, down to the main lot. There is a shuttle that takes you up the hill. Otherwise it's an uphill walk including two flights of steps.

If you get there early (an hour would be about right), there are concessions selling Mexican food, drinks (including wine and beer), and the Ramona Terrace provides table service in the shade, along with a take away window. Food and drinks can be brought into the amphitheater. The only thing they sold inside was cotton candy. There is also a gift shop if you forgot a hat, and also a museum with displays on local sites where the novel is thought to have been set plus posters and photos of past pageants. Don't miss the photo by the door of the crowd at the first pageant. These are also open after the performance if you want to linger until traffic dies down.

The photos posted for this attraction give you a good idea of what the stadium and box seats look like. The stadium seats are concrete with wooden backs with lots of steps up and down to get to them. The center of the stage is sections C and D. Section A and B get the shade earlier, but the sun will be hot and at your back most of the play. The box seats are farthest from the stage but have real chairs and are shaded. You'll be able to see well from any seat, but the sections C and D around row 12 were excellent.

As others have mentioned, bring a pillow, cushion, or stadium chair for comfort, or you can rent a fabric covered cushion. Volunteers will bring you cool wet clothes to stave off the heat. Wear a wide brimmed hat or one with a panel in the back, apply sun screen, and wear light colors and layers. It was very hot early in the play, but cooled off in the shade near the end. Some people used umbrellas before the play and at intermission, but they are not allowed during the play.

Programs are $5 from a booth right at the entrance. They do not sell them inside.

The doors open at 1:30 and the concession stands are open, and different groups dance or play music. The play starts at 3:30; the half hour intermission was at 5:00, the play was over at 6:30. The pace is slower than what you might be used to. There are a few long interludes with dancers and singers--the hoop dancers were mesmerizing! Due to the length of the play, the heat, and most of the subject matter (violence and oppression in California history), some of the children and youth I saw were not engaged and some families left at intermission. A cannon is fired and there are many gunshots. It's all very well done and appropriate for the subject matter but small children may be frightened.

It was almost like being on set of a Western. The horses and their riders were exciting to watch and the actors were excellent. All in all, it was a wonderful afternoon outdoors where history came to life.

7. Estudillo Mansion

150 S Dillon Ave, San Jacinto, CA 92583-4030 +1 951-654-4952
Excellent
50%
Good
50%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 6 reviews

Estudillo Mansion

Reviewed By SereneEcho - Hemet, CA

The 1884 mansion is open for tours on Saturday's and during some city events. We went during the agricultural festival. It's an interesting tour throughout the house. Because we went during an event there were a lot of players and storytellers out on the wrap around porch and in the rooms storytellers dressed in period garb. I imagine it would be more intimate during the Saturday tours. It really is a beautiful house that they've preserved.

8. Simpson Park

28505 Rawlings Rd, Hemet, CA 92544-8365
Excellent
69%
Good
28%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 32 reviews

Simpson Park

Reviewed By Terry D - Parksville, Canada

Simpson Park is a wonderful viewpoint to see and experience the Hemet Valley. With vistas over the valley and Diamond Valley Lake it is a fine place for a picnic, sightseeing, picture taking, hiking, etc.

9. Soboba Casino

23333 Soboba Road, San Jacinto, CA 92583 +1 951-665-1000
Excellent
20%
Good
28%
Satisfactory
11%
Poor
17%
Terrible
24%
Overall Ratings

3 based on 45 reviews

Soboba Casino

Nestled in the foothills of the San Jacinto Mountains, Soboba Casino is a one-stop headquarters for California gaming and entertainment. The casino features 2,000 slot machines and more than 20 table games.

Reviewed By S9332GNgaryl - San Jacinto, California

Took my Mom here. Casino needs updating. You also have to walk through the smoke rooms to get to the non smoking room. Machines don’t pay very well. I won’t waste my time to go back.

10. Diamond Valley Lake

2615 Angler Ave, Hemet, CA 92543-9703 +1 951-926-7201
Excellent
39%
Good
36%
Satisfactory
14%
Poor
7%
Terrible
4%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 69 reviews

Diamond Valley Lake

Diamond Valley Lake is a drinking water reservoir built, owned and operated by The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California. This reservoir is an important component to providing water for 18 million Southern Californians, and is a critical lifeline in times of drought. To protect this resource, no body contact with the water is permitted. However, the Diamond Valley Aquatic Center, located near the entrance to the lake, allows for plenty of fun in the water. The Diamond Valley Visitor Center and the Western Science Center, which houses 1 million paleo and archaeo artifacts found during the construction of the Lake, are also located at the entrance to Diamond Valley Lake. The Lake and the surrounding hills have also become known for the spectacular wildflower blooms each spring, and are popular among hikers. Non-motorized bicycles are also permitted on the Lake View Trail, and equestrians can enjoy the North Hills Trail.

Reviewed By Crt1943 - Rio Vista, California

I wanted to give this wonderful place five stars as it is a beauty. The flower trail was magnificent and we did walk always on it - but not far enough to pay $13 for parking and $2 more for each person -$17 for about thirty minutes of looking at the lake and the flowers. Also, took it down because the ports potties were filled to the rim and the most disgusting I have ever experienced. We did go to the other end of the lake and got in for free, walked up to the point and viewed the lake and left - about the same we did . Why the great expense ? We thought it would be a nice place to go back and walk a little further a bit for $17? Come on folks....we all aren't wealthy.

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