10 Things to Do in Milazzo That You Shouldn't Miss

December 1, 2017 Osvaldo Hartline

Milazzo (Sicilian: Milazzu, Latin: Mylae) is a town (comune) in the Metropolitan City of Messina, Sicily, southern Italy; it is the largest commune in the Metropolitan City after Messina and Barcellona Pozzo di Gotto. The town has a population of around 31,500 inhabitants.
Restaurants in Milazzo

1. Piscina di Venere

Via Sant'Antonio, 98057 Milazzo, Sicily, Italy
Excellent
76%
Good
19%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 538 reviews

Piscina di Venere

Reviewed By Les N

we walked from the old town to visit, it's an hours walk or a bus can get you most of the way. the Piscina di Venere is amazing, once down next to the pool it is secluded and quiet. We visited in the morning and had the place to ourselves until 1pm when there was a small crowd heading down as we left. there is quiet a steep stair case down to it, and the 'beach' is very rocky. Didn't get a chance to swim as the sea was rough and the pool was a bit turbulent. Even without the swim it was very nice to sit and read in the quiet

2. Capo Milazzo - Santuario di Sant'Antonio da Padova

Via Sant'Antonio, Milazzo, Sicily, Italy
Excellent
59%
Good
36%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 158 reviews

Capo Milazzo - Santuario di Sant'Antonio da Padova

Reviewed By Terry S - London, United Kingdom

Walking on the path ahead to the left of the cafe (as opposed to restaurant) take you to the faro/lighthouse and at the end of the peninsular a delightful rock pool dedicated to Venus.
A hundred yards or so before this is a rough but scenic path to the west which leads down to the shoreline and back to near the cafe. Well worth the effort - takes about an hour.

3. Castello di Milazzo

Via Duomo Antico, 98057 Milazzo, Sicily, Italy +39 090 923 1292
Excellent
54%
Good
34%
Satisfactory
9%
Poor
2%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 647 reviews

Castello di Milazzo

Reviewed By AntarcticBound - Brisbane

The castle has been enlarged by the various conquerors of this area of Sicily. It started with a fortress at the top and then enlarged by building a wall to enclose the fort. Later it was enlarged again with another wall to enclose the previous structure, and then again. It was interesting tracing the evolving castle by following the winding pathway to the top through the various gates in the walls. There is a church on the way which is very interesting. At the time we went, there was an exhibition in it as well as a museum of sorts. The climb to the highest point is well rewarded with marvellous views of the coastline and Mt. Etna. Signage within the complex is sparse, but enough to make sense of the history of the place.

4. Spiaggia di Ponente

via Tono, Milazzo, Sicily, Italy
Excellent
48%
Good
35%
Satisfactory
10%
Poor
4%
Terrible
3%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 261 reviews

Spiaggia di Ponente

Reviewed By Carolyn B - Milazzo, Italy

a great beach, which is cleaned almost daily in the summer. the parking/park area above the beach is usually very dirty. But if you look beyond that, which is pretty typical of southern Italy, the view and beach are quite incredible.

5. Milazzo

Via Milazzo 1, 98057 Milazzo, Sicily, Italy
Excellent
44%
Good
40%
Satisfactory
10%
Poor
4%
Terrible
2%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 327 reviews

Milazzo

Reviewed By B1714D - Belgrade, Serbia

Interesting position of Milazzo on a big cape was a reason for us to visit it while driving from Cefalu to the east coast.
Its a small town spread on two shores of that cape. On the eastern shore is a port from where ships for Aeolian Islands are departing, while on the western shore are the Beaches. Between them lies the center of this quiet town, easy to walk. Nothing special to see, but to rest and admire the calm life there.
Had a lunch in one of many restaurants, and proceeded to the northern cape tip for great views of the entire peninsula.
We noticed few oil refineries, and for those driving like us, its useful to know that fuel was cheaper than in other parts of Sicily, so tank full.

6. Capo di Milazzo

Milazzo, Sicily, Italy
Excellent
66%
Good
31%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
0%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 73 reviews

Capo di Milazzo

Reviewed By Christmate11 - Bangkok, Thailand

Driving from Milazzo around the cape is a wonderful side trip. Once you get at the end of the road at the cape, park the car and enjoy the view on the coast. On a clear day, you can see Vulcano island, the nearest of the Lipari Islands. But the thing to do is to walk to the tip of the cape as it is a delightful hike that offers new viewpoints.

7. Chiesa di San Francesco di Paola

Salita San Francesco, Milazzo, Sicily, Italy
Excellent
63%
Good
33%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
2%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 36 reviews

Chiesa di San Francesco di Paola

Reviewed By retireeVancouver - Vancouver

It was about a 15 minute walk from the harbor where our cruise ship had tendered us to this church. We walked along the picturesque seaside Promenade rather than city streets before veering off an uphill side street to visit this church. The impressive balustrade white double staircase in front of the church was a hallmark in identifying this church from surrounding churches. Inside, the painted vaulted ceiling from the front of the church to the back, was a "wow" factor. Perhaps St. Paul was in the enter of the picture, dressed in monk's clothing, being received into heaven by angels. The main altar was another focal point located by the apse. The semicircular dome of the apse was painted in the same tones as the ceiling, all blending in perfectly with the rusty red color in the marble around walls of the main altar. There was a white canopy on the main altar with a statute of a person in monk's clothing and a crown of stars overhead. - again St. Paul? Additional white statuary framed this canopy. The stained glass windows were quite different for a church. Instead of religious scenes, I saw floral images and horns of plenty holding fruits, done in aqua, yellow, purple, and green colors. The pillars were white in color and set off the painted ceiling, the apse, and the main altar. We noted that churches in town may close around noon for a few hours, so we planned our visit accordingly (hours posted on church's website). The inside of the church did not disappoint, but the weeds growing on the steps outside made the church look uncared for. It was a working church so worshipers must see these weeds at least weekly if not more. Couldn't someone pull these weeds? For us this visit was a photostop - 5 -7 minutes.

8. Viewpoint la Manica

Via Manica, Milazzo, Sicily, Italy
Excellent
90%
Good
10%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 28 reviews

Viewpoint la Manica

Reviewed By B1714D - Belgrade, Serbia

Few km north from the small town of Milazzo takes you to this viewpoint. There's a big parking lot and few restaurants. You cannot drive any further, so you wont miss it.
A big Terrace offers great views of entire Milazzo peninsula, Aeolian Islands and northern Sicily. Great photo opt.

9. Lido La Fenice a Milazzo

Litorale Riviera di Ponente, 98051 Milazzo, Sicily, Italy +39 340 546 7467
Excellent
39%
Good
32%
Satisfactory
9%
Poor
5%
Terrible
15%
Overall Ratings

3.5 based on 136 reviews

Lido La Fenice a Milazzo

Reviewed By Carolyn B - Milazzo, Italy

this newer lido is well maintained and has a nice pool. It is very accessible for wheel chairs and has bathrooms, showers, a snack bar, and restaurant. It even has a nice little playground. There is a lot of parking and it is near to several apartments for rent.

10. Antiquarium D. Ryolo

Via Impallomeni, Milazzo, Sicily, Italy +39 090 922 3471
Excellent
18%
Good
58%
Satisfactory
18%
Poor
6%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4 based on 16 reviews

Antiquarium D. Ryolo

Reviewed By retireeVancouver - Vancouver

Pottery and assorted containers - some in shards, some pieced together - that had been found in archaeological digs in the Milazzo area and that dated from prehistory to the Bronze Age were on display in 9 very well air conditioned rooms. It was rare to find a museum with this concentration of pottery, IMO. I was amazed that there were no displays of coins, jewellery, tools, weapons, etc. belonging to these people - just clay pots. Individual items in the display cases were labelled only in Italian so it was important to read the main information board (English and Italian) in each room which explained the purpose of the display. After Reading this board I became very interested in the display as I looked for the changes in pottery construction, design, and decoration described on the board. These changes, the archaeologists concluded, had come about because of contact with other nearby cultures, even those across the Mediterranean Sea, probably through trade. It was also interesting to compare the designs of the pre-history, Stone Age and Bronze Age people. The more recent pots, as one would expect, were highly decorated with lots of dots and zig zag lines. A group of children who had visited the museum, tried their hand at decorating pots in the tradition of those on display and that display was interesting to see too. Additionally, one room showed the burial practices of these ancient people.
Admission was free. The museum was cool and modern and was easily found on Via Impallomeni, about 1 block away from Chiesa di san Francesco di Paola. There were no public toilets here. We stayed about 15 minutes as hubby was anxious to get going.

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