10 Things to Do in Malden That You Shouldn't Miss

September 16, 2017 Ying Subia

Malden is a city in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. At the time of the 2010 United States Census, the population was at 59,450 people. In 2009, Malden was named the "Best Place to Raise Your Kids" in Massachusetts by Bloomberg Businessweek.
Restaurants in Malden

1. Night Shift Brewing

87 Santilli Hwy, Everett, MA 02149-1906 +1 617-294-4233
Excellent
74%
Good
22%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 123 reviews

Night Shift Brewing

Reviewed By Dublin3 - Dublin3

Great micro-brewery with some really tasty beers. They have rotating small batch brews, and their regular beers. Lots of seats, inside & out, and there is usually a food truck parked outside for eats. It's a great spot for a beer on the way home, or some evening with friends.

2. Boda Borg Boston

90 Pleasant St, Malden, MA 02148-4905 +1 781-321-1081
Excellent
77%
Good
13%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
1%
Terrible
5%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 73 reviews

Boda Borg Boston

Are you ready to break out of prison, be on a TV game show, explore a haunted house or run an obstacle course? Boda Borg Boston has seventeen Quests to challenge your team. You'll climb, crawl, explore and fail -- a lot -- as you work together to conquer our challenging Quests.

Reviewed By Trapezegirl - Connecticut

We went to Rockport MA for a long weekend. Took a drive to Malden (about 50 minutes) to go here. Heard good things. IMPORTANT - Make a reservation ahead of time!! When we made our reservation it was $20 for 2 hours or $30 for as long as you would like. What a deal. Where can you go this cheap???? The unlimited hour time slots were all booked, so we did the 2 hours. How we wish we had more time....... Had the time of our life. Me and my 2 sisters. You need AT LEAST 3 people. Cant say much more that that, otherwise I would have to give away secrets to the quests. Just if you are in the area you need to go

3. Fenway Park

4 Yawkey Way, Boston, MA 02215-3409 +1 617-267-1700
Excellent
77%
Good
18%
Satisfactory
3%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 13 reviews

Fenway Park

Hallowed ground to baseball purists, this cozy, quirky park has been the Boston Red Sox home field since 1912. The most distinctive feature of this classic baseball park is the 37-foot-tall left field wall, known as the "Green Monster."

Reviewed By burnboy - Sunrise, Florida

Fenway is one of the greatest places to see baseball how it is meant to be. Hot (or Cold) but close to the players and with an atmosphere unlike any modern stadium. Food isn't that great but that isn't why you come here.

4. Davis Square

Somerville, MA
Excellent
55%
Good
38%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 186 reviews

Davis Square

Reviewed By CTTraveler56 - Greenwich, Connecticut

Nice spot in Somerville, but beware of the crowd.
Being so close to Tufts University, it gets impossible to dine in the area restaurants if you do not have a reservation (some do not accept reservation), especially on week ends.
Convenient Subway to Cambridge & Boston.

5. Mount Auburn Cemetery

580 Mount Auburn St, Cambridge, MA 02138-5529 +1 617-547-7105
Excellent
79%
Good
17%
Satisfactory
2%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

5 based on 541 reviews

Mount Auburn Cemetery

Mount Auburn Cemetery was founded in 1831 as America's first landscaped cemetery. A National Historic Landmark, its renowned landscape inspired the creation of the nation's public parks. Mount Auburn was designated an Important Bird Area by the Massachusetts Audubon Society, reinforcing its status as a significant wildlife sanctuary. Still an active burial place, Mount Auburn Cemetery provides comfort and solace to countless families. The Friends of Mount Auburn Cemetery was established in 1986 to assist in the conservation of the Cemetery's natural beauty and to promote the appreciation of its cultural, historic, and natural resources. Over 100 public programs are offered annually by the Friends to educate, enrich, and inspire the community. The Friends seeks financial support for education and interpretive programs and materials for the public, specific cultural projects, and operational support for horticultural rejuvenation and the preservation of the historic monuments, structures, and archival artifacts and records.

Reviewed By Callisto S - S. Natick, MA

Went during the Spring during the warbler migration and had some luck spotting various warblers, orioles, hawks and other birds! The variety of plantings around the differently landscaped grave areas give the feel of different environmental “rooms.” So beautiful!

6. Saugus Iron Works

244 Central St, Saugus, MA 01906-2188 +1 781-233-0050
Excellent
69%
Good
26%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 117 reviews

Saugus Iron Works

In the 1600's, on the banks of the Saugus River, something extraordinary happened. Explore the place where European iron makers brought their special skills to a young Massachusetts colony. This nine-acre National Park includes working waterwheels, hot forges, mills, an historic 17th century home and a lush river basin.

Reviewed By SUSAN M - Hollywood, Florida

Saugus Iron Works is a National Historic Park. This one apparently is not very popular; tours are offered only once a day and the park opens May 1st for only six months of the year. Both my husband (not a history buff) and I found it fascinating. Perfect sunny weather didn't hurt. By the time we arrived at 1:30, the day's visitor count was only 26.

This site was the first successful plant for the production of cast and wrought iron in the Americas. Production began in 1646 using technology equal to that used in Europe at the time. Iron products were needed for farm tools, barrel straps, wagon wheels, blacksmiths, building materials, etc. The men working there were indentured servants, not Puritans – arrested English artisans as well as Scottish soldiers deported after capture.

The work was demanding and dangerous. Moisture was the worst. A tiny drop of water falling on molten metal could blow up the entire furnace. Due to financial issues and embezzlement, the mill closed in less than ten years. The workers, however, stayed in New England starting other ironworks that formed the foundation of the future US iron and steel industries.

Our guide demonstrated the actual workings. Water from the adjacent Saugus River drove water wheels that provided needed power. In one building (all are reconstructions) the iron was smelted in a blast furnace and cast into pig iron (workers thought the sand molds for casting resembled a sow with piglets – thus the name). In the next it was forged into varying qualities: pounding with massive 500 pound hammers changed the molecular structure forming 'wrought' iron. Different quality iron was needed for varying products. A third building contained rolling and slitting machinery that could change the iron’s shape, producing flat and/or small items. The park museum contained a number of excavated artifacts and small working models as well as film.

The Ironworks House is the only structure at the park that survives from the 1600s. After more than a century of owner modifications, it was restored in the early 1900’s to its original condition. We were the only two on a tour through the House. The park ranger explained how original wood beams were recognized and dated, and pointed out two different saw cuts in the wood. Every screw, hook, wood shingle and nail was handmade. He really made it interesting.

Before the early 20th century excavations there was no above ground sign of any part of the Ironworks or House other than a slag heap at the edge of the river. A road actually ran across the property. So the creation and restoration of this Historic Site is quite amazing. We stayed more than three hours

7. Freedom Trail

Boston, MA 02109 +1 617-357-8300
Excellent
69%
Good
25%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 14 reviews

Freedom Trail

The red line on the sidewalk leads you on this 2.5-mile, self-guided tour of American Revolution sites. It starts at the Boston Common, America's oldest public park, and ends at the famed Bunker Hill Monument.

Reviewed By davidedwardscafc - Rochester, United Kingdom

There are guides that will take you on the Freedom Trail from the Tourist Office in Boston Common. For a worthwhile tour avail yourself of the knowledge of the local tour guide. The experience will be so much more worthwhile. Fascinating explanations behind the actions of the patriots

8. Middlesex Fells Reservation

127 E Border Rd # 159, Malden, MA 02148 +1 617-727-5380
Excellent
45%
Good
42%
Satisfactory
13%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 38 reviews

Middlesex Fells Reservation

Reviewed By Lisa S - New York City, New York

This beautiful reservation is located in
The City of Malden, Massachusetts. My Mothers parents , Grandmother Belle and ,Grandfather Frankie, lived here at 41 Dexter Street .

They're home is now a National Historic Landmark. The home was built in 1902. The Pantry of they're home was bigger than my New York Apartment.

My Father's parents lived at 42 Montrose, Newton,
Massachusetts in 1940. At the time my
Daddy was 13 years old. My Grandmother and Grandfather were both 42 years old in 1940. My Grandfather was a Coat Designer. My Grandmother, who went to College in Paris ,was the brains of the businesses they owned together. My Grandfather, Harry made his money during the Great Depression because he Designed an inexpensive coat, that was so beautiful that both Rich and Poor people bought it ,at that time.
He lost money after the Depression was over.

Eventually they sold their beach house located on the water at Nantasket Beach,Hull Massachusetts-
Which looks like Dune Road in Westhampton , New York.

I played in that Victorian home on beach as a small child and watched the Massachusetts Butterflies there and Fireflies at night. Later my Fathers parents moved to Natick, Massachusetts, where the Vice President of The Massachusetts Butterfly Club lives.

I will always remember my Grandparents
With great affection.

Eurema Lisa

9. Harvard Art Museums

32 Quincy St, Cambridge, MA 02138-3804 +1 617-495-9400
Excellent
69%
Good
24%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
1%
Terrible
1%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 363 reviews

Harvard Art Museums

The Harvard Art Museums house one of the largest and most renowned art collections in the United States, and are comprised of three museums (the Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Arthur M. Sackler Museums) and four research centers (the Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies, the Center for the Technical Study of Modern Art, the Harvard Art Museums Archives, and the Archaeological Exploration of Sardis). The Fogg Museum includes Western art from the Middle Ages to the present; the Busch-Reisinger Museum, unique among North American museums, is dedicated to the study of all modes and periods of art from central and northern Europe, with an emphasis on German-speaking countries; and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum is focused on Asian art, Ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern art, and Islamic and later Indian art. Together, the collections include approximately 250,000 objects in all media. The Harvard Art Museums are distinguished by the range and depth of their collections, their groundbreaking exhibitions, and the original research of their staff. Integral to Harvard University and the wider community, the museums and research centers serve as resources for students, scholars, and the public. For more than a century they have been the nation’s premier training ground for museum professionals and are renowned for their seminal role in developing the discipline of art history in the United States. The Harvard Art Museums have a rich tradition of considering the history of objects as an integral part of the teaching and study of art history, focusing on conservation and preservation concerns as well as technical studies. The Harvard Art Museums’ 2014 renovation and expansion carried on the legacies of the three museums and united their remarkable collections under one roof for the first time. Renzo Piano Building Workshop preserved the Fogg Museum’s landmark 1927 facility, while transforming the space to accommodate 21st-century needs. The museums now feature 40 percent more gallery space, an expanded Art Study Center, conservation labs, and classrooms, and a striking glass roof that bridges the facility’s historic and contemporary architecture. The three constituent museums retain their distinct identities in the facility, yet their close proximity provides exciting opportunities to experience works of art in a broader context.

Reviewed By Angelo S - Hilliard, Ohio

I was very surprised to see such an extensive collection of ancient pottery within this art museum. The museum itself is very large, with significant amounts of space to move around and some really great works (self portrait of Van Gough, full portrait of Washington, works by Picasso and Monet). For me the pottery was the most interesting and I spend a significant amount of time in that area and the space dedicated to Mediterranean and Near Eastern Art.

10. Idle Hands Craft Ales

89 Commercial St, Malden, MA 02148-5509 +1 781-333-6070
Excellent
55%
Good
38%
Satisfactory
7%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 13 reviews

Idle Hands Craft Ales

Reviewed By samls86 - Boston, Massachusetts

Idle hands has had a tough go in the past in regards to location, but their new spot is perfect and I'm glad to see them doing well!

Nice taproom with plenty of room, snacks, and great list of beers to sample. Very comfortable spot for groups or coupes. We will be back!

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