10 Churches & Cathedrals in City of London That You Shouldn't Miss

August 1, 2021 Harland Bartelt

The crown jewels, Buckingham Palace, Camden Market…in London, history collides with art, fashion, food, and good British ale. A perfect day is different for everyone: culture aficionados shouldn't miss the Tate Modern and the Royal Opera House. If you love fashion, Oxford Street has shopping galore. For foodies, cream tea at Harrod’s or crispy fish from a proper chippy offers classic London flavor. Music and book buffs will love seeing Abbey Road and the Sherlock Holmes Museum (at 221B Baker Street, of course).
Restaurants in London

1. St. Paul's Cathedral

St Paul's Churchyard, London EC4M 8AD England +44 20 7246 8350 [email protected] http://www.stpauls.co.uk/
Excellent
65%
Good
25%
Satisfactory
6%
Poor
2%
Terrible
2%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 17,029 reviews

St. Paul's Cathedral

Rebuilt by Christopher Wren after the great Fire of 1666, St. Paul's has been the site of many historic state occasions; including Sir Winston Churchill's state funeral and the Royal Wedding of Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer. A busy working Christian community with several daily services at which all are welcome. St Paul’s also welcomes visitors with access to five levels of the Cathedral including the Whispering Gallery with its unique acoustics and the Stone and Golden Galleries atop the Dome offering breathtaking panoramic views over London. Multimedia guides in eight languages for adults and children are included with sightseeing admission as well as free guided tours to join upon arrival.

Reviewed By 448jw - Markham, Canada

We've visited many renowned churches around the world and while there're similarity it doesn't take away their own beauty! this church is amazing and their dome is also facinating! Climb the stairs and you can also reach the top (narrow stairs and the highest level) to get an amazing view of the city and the entire London Skyline!

2. St. Mary Abchurch

Off Cannon Street / King William Street Abchurch Yard, London EC4N 7BA England +44 20 7626 4481 http://achurchnearyou.com
Excellent
56%
Good
31%
Satisfactory
13%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 16 reviews

St. Mary Abchurch

This church was destroyed in the Great Fire of 1666 and rebuilt by Christopher Wren from 1681 to 1687, with its landmark tower four stories high, rising to 51 feet.

Reviewed By SMOGtraveller - London, United Kingdom

A n interesting church tucked away off Cannon Street, the lovely Friends of City Churches have a fiiendly, helpful person on duty to help you get the most out of you visit. One useful tip, let your eyes get used to the fairly dark interior so you can enjoy the detail of the painting in the dome. Do read theor little booklet baout the chuech.

3. St. Stephen Walbrook

39 Walbrook, London EC4N 8BN England +44 20 7626 9000 http://ststephenwalbrook.net/
Excellent
66%
Good
26%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
0%
Terrible
3%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 92 reviews

St. Stephen Walbrook

Said to be the most complex and accomplished of Christopher Wren's churches (1672-79), the structure incorporates a large central dome and a cross-in-square plan, which recall the structures of Byzantium.

Reviewed By Escape716563

My Old School extendd the Invitation to all Old Boys to attend the inaugrial Christmas Carol Service in 2018 and, afterwards, mulled wine and hot mince pies! The same service was again held this year, 2019. St.Stephen Walbrook is the MOST beautiful church one could possibly imagine. It is well-worth visiting in its own right, if one finds oneself in London. The congregation sit in concentric circles around the central Altar which, l believe, weighs one ton of solid marble, St.Stephen Walbrook is steeped in history and is one of three in the area to have escaped the Great Fire of London. Close to the Mansion House, this is very much in the Financial District of "The Square Mile". W.G.

4. St Bride's Church

Fleet Street, London EC4Y 8AU England +44 20 7427 0133 [email protected] http://www.stbrides.com/
Excellent
53%
Good
43%
Satisfactory
4%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 113 reviews

St Bride's Church

Just down the road from majestic St Paul's Cathedral is another of Sir Christopher Wren's creations, the little known church of St Bride's, also called "The Journalists' Church." Tucked away in a busy corner of Fleet Street, it is easy to miss, but look out for the towering steeple. It may look unremarkable next to the grandeur of St Paul's, but this tiny church was the home of the first printing press, inspired the multilayered wedding cake and triggered a row between Benjamin Franklin and George the III. Among the parishioners of this church were such literary figures as Milton, Dryden, Johnson and Pepys. St Bride takes its name from the Irish saint St Bridget of Kildare, a 5th century Irish saint famous for her hospitality, who founded several churches. Since then, several reconstructions have followed. After the original church was destroyed by the Great Fire of London in 1666, Sir Christopher Wren redesigned the building in 1673. His building, in turn, was destroyed by bombing during the Second World War, but the much-admired steeple survived. The present building is a reconstruction of Wren's design. As you step into the church, you will notice the several memorials to journalists, newspapers and the printing trade. In 1500 William Caxton's assistant, the aptly named Wynkyn de Worde, brought the first moveable type printing press to the church courtyard. It was used to print religious books and messages from the clergy, and later to print books and plays. Nearby churches also began to set up printing presses, and ever since then Fleet Street has been the centre of the publishing industry. Writers including Samuel Johnson, Boswell and Pope lived near St Bride's. That quintessential Londoner, Samuel Pepys, was born just around the corner and baptized in St Bride's. The journalist's altar at one end of the church was established when hostages were being taken in the Middle East. It now commemorates journalists killed or injured worldwide. A brass plaque also commemorates the 300th anniversary of the founding of the world's first daily newspaper, the Daily Courant, in 1702. The graceful spire, originally 234 feet, is the tallest of Wren's steeples and has inspired many a poet. Among these was W.E. Henley, who in his poem "The Song of the Sword" described the spire thus, The while the fanciful, formal finicking charm Of Bride's, that madrigal of the stone Grows flushed and warm And beauteous with a beauty not its own. The spire also inspired a Fleet Street confectioner called Thomas Rich, who made a replica of the spire in icing, a model for the traditional wedding cake still seen today. The party dress of Rich's wife is displayed in a glass case in the church, perhaps in thanks for her contribution! The steeple also triggered a comical row between King George the III and scientist Benjamin Franklin. In 1764 the spire was struck by lightening, which reduced its height by 8 feet. Franklin, by then considered an expert on lightning, was asked to advise the King on the installation of lightening rods. Franklin suggested installing conductors with pointed ends, but the King wanted to install blunt ones. Not surprisingly, the King got his way. The British political press was delighted with the outcome, and published propaganda gleefully praising the King "as good blunt honest George" while the hapless Franklin was described as "a sharp-witted colonist." The church has other connections to America. The parents of Virginia Dare, the first white child born in America and named after the state of Virginia, were married in this church in 1584. A bust of Virginia was originally displayed in the church, but was later stolen. A replica stands in its place. Edward Winslow, one of the leaders of the Mayflower and later Governor of Plymouth in Massachusetts, was also married in this church. It was not until 1953 that archeologists discovered that St Bride's stands on Roman remains dating back to the 2nd century A.D, including a Roman pavement. On a grislier note the church crypt was also found to contain thousands of human remains, thought to belong to victims of the Great Plague of 1665 and the cholera epidemic of 1854. These have now been given a proper burial, and visitors interested in the church's Roman origins can now enter the crypt to see the original Roman ruins. by Kavitha Rao

Reviewed By TravelVictoriously - London, United Kingdom

Stop by this quiet gem. Located a few steps off Fleet Street, St Brides has an amazing history and a beautiful museum under the church along the Roman ruins and artifacts. The staff were helpful and knowledgeable.

5. St. Giles Cripplegate

Fore and Wood Streets London Wall, London EC2 England +44 20 7638 1997 [email protected] http://www.stgilescripplegate.com/
Excellent
47%
Good
53%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 15 reviews

St. Giles Cripplegate

Reviewed By Fosseboy - Western Australia, Australia

Really hidden amongst the tall buildings of the Barbican. Pretty old church. The choir were rehearsing carols so that added to the ambience.

6. Temple Church

The Temple King's Bench Walk, London EC4Y 7BB England +44 20 7353 3470 [email protected] http://www.templechurch.com/
Excellent
63%
Good
31%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 671 reviews

Temple Church

Reviewed By Briantripadvising - Hale, United Kingdom

Ashamed to say never looked for this Knights Templar built church. It's worth going to see the tomb of William Marshall one of Englands' greatest knights. Located in Temple bar you can roam around the fascinating chambers of the great and the good? of the legal profession. Then have a good march along the River and and see what's on at Somerset House before selecting a coffee and cake at Fortnum & Masons. What a civilised and cultured few hours!

7. Church of St. Bartholomew the Great

West Smithfield, London EC1A 9DS England +44 20 7600 0440 [email protected] http://www.greatstbarts.com/
Excellent
68%
Good
24%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
1%
Terrible
2%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 241 reviews

Church of St. Bartholomew the Great

London’s oldest parish church is open and free to enter In-person and online services: Please see our website.

Reviewed By tinkle_24 - Northampton, United Kingdom

A 900 year old Church which has stood the test of time. Beautiful tiered inside with beautiful arches. Highly recommended.

8. All Hallows By The Tower

Byward Street, London EC3R 5BJ England +44 20 7481 2928 [email protected] http://www.ahbtt.org.uk
Excellent
63%
Good
31%
Satisfactory
5%
Poor
1%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 280 reviews

All Hallows By The Tower

Please note that the Crypt Museum is currently closed and that the church is open for limited hours only. We are very sorry not to see you and hope that you will visit in the future. All Hallows By The Tower church (sometimes known historically as 'All Hallows Barking') was founded in 675 AD and, throughout London's history, has played a key part in almost every important event. A Roman pavement, Saxon stonework, Mediaeval paintings and statues, and the glorious Grinling Gibbons font cover are all on show. This is the church where the Knights Templar had their London trials, Samuel Pepys watched the Great Fire of London from the tower, where William Penn (founder of Pennsylvania) was baptised and where President John Quincy Adams married a local girl. It is the founding place of Toc H and 'Tubby' Clayton was Vicar here for 40 years. The church has a characterful Crypt Museum and an excellent cafe - Byward Kitchen & Bar.

Reviewed By jenniealee - Mesa, United States

Founded in 675, it is one of the oldest churches in London, and contains inside a 7th-century Anglo-Saxon arch with recycled Roman tiles, the oldest surviving piece of church fabric in the city. My friend and I visited this church in July 2019. This is a great tucked away church steaming with history. It was really interesting to see the Roman road under the church

9. St. Michael Paternoster Royal Church

St. Michael Paternoster Royal College Hill, London EC4R 2RL England +44 20 3837 5200 https://www.london.anglican.org/directory/st-michael-paternoster-royal/
Excellent
36%
Good
55%
Satisfactory
9%
Poor
0%
Terrible
0%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 11 reviews

St. Michael Paternoster Royal Church

Church designed by Christopher Wren.

Reviewed By hughdb - Cobham, United Kingdom

A beautiful service with choirs from Lloyd’s and a primary School from Teesside. Princess Anne read a lesson and socialised afterwards at the Skinner’s’ Hall.

10. St Helen's Bishopsgate Church

Great St. Helens, London EC3A 6AT England +44 20 7283 2231 http://www.st-helens.org.uk
Excellent
50%
Good
46%
Satisfactory
0%
Poor
0%
Terrible
4%
Overall Ratings

4.5 based on 24 reviews

St Helen's Bishopsgate Church

Reviewed By 168PeterG

Having visited this church for a wedding I was both impressed by the building itself and the people who ran and attended it. The building has been well preserved for its historical importance, but what impressed me more was the appeal the church people there have for the local community. The church is well staffed and services are full of attenders. What a wonderful treat it was to enter an old church not just kept as a dead museum piece but also vibrantly alive and full of enthusiastic members offering service of all kinds to those who live and work nearby. What a change to see a church being used for what it was built for hundreds of years ago. For those not interested in any kind of religion, this is als a place not to miss.

ThingsTodoPost © 2018 All rights reserved.